Meet Glen Ferrarotto - OTG Veteran

Meet Glen Ferrarotto - OTG Veteran

“When I left the Army in 2008, I went through a recruitment agency. Even at that point, I thought it would be great to have an agency that I could talk to from a soldier’s perspective - to not have to try to be a civilian person, with civilian qualifications, which at that point I wasn’t” says Glen. “After a few years in Industry I realised the importance of employers truly understanding the unique experience and skills that veterans have, to look beyond a CV".

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Humans of Old Trinity #3 - Robbie Gillies

Humans of Old Trinity #3 - Robbie Gillies

“Something that’s stayed with me is the old cliché that opportunity is its own reward. A few times I’ve had to push myself at forks in the road when the future is uncertain – not knowing exactly why I’m about to say yes to something, not being able to justify or rationalise exactly why I’m doing something, not necessarily even being enthusiastic about a big opportunity – but just say yes. Just take for granted that something positive is going to come from taking leaps of faith down the track.”

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Humans of Old Trinity #1 - Chris Amiconi

Humans of Old Trinity #1 - Chris Amiconi

"I loved Trinity’s co-curricular programs as a student, and I still love them all as a staff member. And that’s great, because when you love doing something, it’s infectious. It makes other people want to get involved when they otherwise wouldn’t have. That’s how I got into stuff like touch rugby and bushwalking as a kid. Bushwalking’s never been in the Amiconi name, but I saw one of my mates loving it, so I came along and tried it and I loved it too. That feeling of trying something you never would have because you saw the passion someone had for it – it’s just as real for me as a staff member now as it was for me when I was a student."

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Humans of Old Trinity #2 - Andrew Harris

Humans of Old Trinity #2 - Andrew Harris

“The worst advice I got was probably the dialogue around finishing school. Most of the time all you hear is, ‘You finish school, so you get a score, so you can go to Uni,’ and that the next step has to be Uni. And that is what I did, but it’s not good to just be told you have to go down a certain path like that. There’s a little mantra I try to live by: ‘You don’t have to know what you want to do, you just have to know what you want to do next.’ I don’t have to know exactly where I’ll be in ten years’ time, but if I know I want to work now, I’ll work; if I know I want to travel, I’ll travel. Forcing a kid to follow a certain path, like Uni, that they don’t want to follow – that’s the worst bit of advice you can give someone.”

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