Humans of Old Trinity #6 - Brendan Iezzi

Humans of Old Trinity #6 - Brendan Iezzi

“Being captain not only an honour, but actually a huge task as well. You’re dealing with blokes straight out of school, not knowing what they want to do, through to people in the workforce. Getting a whole bunch of people together and having them all focus on one thing is tricky – it’s a great mix between keeping fit, training, and wanting to win, as well as having a beer and really enjoying yourself outside of it. One of the biggest things for me was when I retired, and having numerous mums actually coming up to me and thanking me for the influence I’ve had on their kids. That’s one of the greater things I’ve had in my career.”

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Humans of Old Trinity #4 - Graham Harris

Humans of Old Trinity #4 - Graham Harris

“As a kid, I was a bit of a handful - I was never going to be a prefect! I loved the school, and I never got into any real trouble, but I had times when I had to wash my mouth out with soap and water because I swore about something. I remember at one stage of the game, I had to drop my dacks and put my bum up against a brick wall in order to cool it down because it was that red after getting six of the best off Mr Leppitt!”

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Meet Glen Ferrarotto - OTG Veteran

Meet Glen Ferrarotto - OTG Veteran

“When I left the Army in 2008, I went through a recruitment agency. Even at that point, I thought it would be great to have an agency that I could talk to from a soldier’s perspective - to not have to try to be a civilian person, with civilian qualifications, which at that point I wasn’t” says Glen. “After a few years in Industry I realised the importance of employers truly understanding the unique experience and skills that veterans have, to look beyond a CV".

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Humans of Old Trinity #3 - Robbie Gillies

Humans of Old Trinity #3 - Robbie Gillies

“Something that’s stayed with me is the old cliché that opportunity is its own reward. A few times I’ve had to push myself at forks in the road when the future is uncertain – not knowing exactly why I’m about to say yes to something, not being able to justify or rationalise exactly why I’m doing something, not necessarily even being enthusiastic about a big opportunity – but just say yes. Just take for granted that something positive is going to come from taking leaps of faith down the track.”

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Humans of Old Trinity #1 - Chris Amiconi

Humans of Old Trinity #1 - Chris Amiconi

"I loved Trinity’s co-curricular programs as a student, and I still love them all as a staff member. And that’s great, because when you love doing something, it’s infectious. It makes other people want to get involved when they otherwise wouldn’t have. That’s how I got into stuff like touch rugby and bushwalking as a kid. Bushwalking’s never been in the Amiconi name, but I saw one of my mates loving it, so I came along and tried it and I loved it too. That feeling of trying something you never would have because you saw the passion someone had for it – it’s just as real for me as a staff member now as it was for me when I was a student."

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Humans of Old Trinity #2 - Andrew Harris

Humans of Old Trinity #2 - Andrew Harris

“The worst advice I got was probably the dialogue around finishing school. Most of the time all you hear is, ‘You finish school, so you get a score, so you can go to Uni,’ and that the next step has to be Uni. And that is what I did, but it’s not good to just be told you have to go down a certain path like that. There’s a little mantra I try to live by: ‘You don’t have to know what you want to do, you just have to know what you want to do next.’ I don’t have to know exactly where I’ll be in ten years’ time, but if I know I want to work now, I’ll work; if I know I want to travel, I’ll travel. Forcing a kid to follow a certain path, like Uni, that they don’t want to follow – that’s the worst bit of advice you can give someone.”

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